How to Improve Immigrants’ English

British Pathé instructional film from the 1940s.

We stayed in this hotel in Brighton, which looks like a crackhead-infested council block rather than the 4-star Holiday Inn that it actually is. It is fair to say that it does not fit harmoniously with the many fine buildings on Brighton seafront. You could say it’s Brighton’s equivalent to Leicester’s blue tower in terms of its sheet inappropriateness. On the plus side, it’s pleasant enough once you’re inside, it has a guests’ car park (rare for Brighton) and it’s in an excellent location right next to the beach. I still think they should pull it down, though.

We stayed in this hotel in Brighton, which looks like a crackhead-infested council block rather than the 4-star Holiday Inn that it actually is. It is fair to say that it does not fit harmoniously with the many fine buildings on Brighton seafront. You could say it’s Brighton’s equivalent to Leicester’s blue tower in terms of its sheet inappropriateness. On the plus side, it’s pleasant enough once you’re inside, it has a guests’ car park (rare for Brighton) and it’s in an excellent location right next to the beach. I still think they should pull it down, though.

Not at all bad for the time of year

Not at all bad for the time of year

The 34 More Beers Project: Krušovice Imperial
'Rich toasted malt and caramel dominate the palate but there's a solid underpinning of piny hops', according to Roger Protz. I can’t say that I noticed much of that but its still a perfectly reasonable Czech lager. It does what a lager is supposed to do. 
23 more left.

The 34 More Beers Project: Krušovice Imperial

'Rich toasted malt and caramel dominate the palate but there's a solid underpinning of piny hops', according to Roger Protz. I can’t say that I noticed much of that but its still a perfectly reasonable Czech lager. It does what a lager is supposed to do. 

23 more left.

This is my attempt at the Dawa, which is apparently the national drink of Kenya. Travel writer Rob Crossan was talking about Kenyan music on Cerys Matthews’ BBC 6Music show last week and he happened to mention how much he enjoyed the Dawa drink. I’d never heard of this beverage before so I did a bit of research and made one myself. You need a short piece of wood (a Dawa stick) for this drink, and I found that a sawn-off section from a wooden chopstick did the job just fine.
To make a Dawa, you chop up half a lime and crush the pieces in a glass with a teaspoon of brown sugar. You then add crushed ice and 50ml of vodka. Next, you dip your Dawa stick in honey and put it in the drink. You then stir the stick occasionally to release more honey.
Drink experts will recognise that the Dawa has probably been inspired by Brazil’s caiprinha. It’s a good warm weather drink, one I’d happily have again. I’ve also noticed that one of the pleasures of this beverage is that twiddling the Dawa stick around gives you something to do between sips.  

This is my attempt at the Dawa, which is apparently the national drink of Kenya. Travel writer Rob Crossan was talking about Kenyan music on Cerys Matthews’ BBC 6Music show last week and he happened to mention how much he enjoyed the Dawa drink. I’d never heard of this beverage before so I did a bit of research and made one myself. You need a short piece of wood (a Dawa stick) for this drink, and I found that a sawn-off section from a wooden chopstick did the job just fine.

To make a Dawa, you chop up half a lime and crush the pieces in a glass with a teaspoon of brown sugar. You then add crushed ice and 50ml of vodka. Next, you dip your Dawa stick in honey and put it in the drink. You then stir the stick occasionally to release more honey.

Drink experts will recognise that the Dawa has probably been inspired by Brazil’s caiprinha. It’s a good warm weather drink, one I’d happily have again. I’ve also noticed that one of the pleasures of this beverage is that twiddling the Dawa stick around gives you something to do between sips.  

It would not be legally permissible to bury Richard III in York Minster…

…according to Rev. Pete Hobson of Leicester Cathedral. He mentions this in passing in this piece about the Yorkshire Post's bizarrely belated campaign to have RIII buried at York Minster but regrettably gives no further details. Here's what he says:

'Of course York Minster is a great and glorious building.  Of course it’s historic and attracts vast numbers of tourists and visitors.  No doubt an extra king buried in there (were it legally permissible – which by the way we understand it’s not) would do all that nothing but good.   And similarly, no doubt a reburial in Leicester Cathedral will do our city’s tourism offer no harm.   But that’s not the point – is it?   This is not about one city battling another – let alone one Cathedral taking up arms against another.  We have nothing but good things to say about our colleagues up there.  And they about us, as far as I’m aware!’

If he’s right (and it’s a big ‘if’ as he hasn’t shown us his evidence), the alternatives to a Leicester burial are becoming ever-smaller. After all, Westminster Abbey (a popular choice amongst enthusiastic Ricardians) is an impossibility; it’s full up and now only allows ashes to be interred there.

A poignant comment from the entirely authentic Richard III twitter account.

A poignant comment from the entirely authentic Richard III twitter account.

As it is now past midday, it is too late to post a Saturday Morning Skank Spot. I hope followers are not too disappointed. The popular feature will return next week.

Sue Townsend at home in Leicester in 1992, alongside her life-size model of legendary local fat bloke Daniel Lambert. 

Sue Townsend at home in Leicester in 1992, alongside her life-size model of legendary local fat bloke Daniel Lambert