My holiday beer of choice is usually the local mini-supermarket’s own-brand lager. This is from Utile, which is the dominant franchise in this corner of the South of France. At 4.2% ABV, it’s an ideal strength for beach drinking and multi-packs of the little 25cl bottles cost next to nothing. It tastes pleasant enough in this heat when straight out the fridge.

My holiday beer of choice is usually the local mini-supermarket’s own-brand lager. This is from Utile, which is the dominant franchise in this corner of the South of France. At 4.2% ABV, it’s an ideal strength for beach drinking and multi-packs of the little 25cl bottles cost next to nothing. It tastes pleasant enough in this heat when straight out the fridge.

After a terrifying white-knuckle drive along extremely narrow mountain roads with precipitous drops at the side and no barriers to stop you plunging to your doom (how can such roads even be legal in France?), we made it to the charming village of Collobrieres. The locals often tackle these roads at wholly inappropriate speeds, which explains the number of wrecked cars that litter the hillsides. Twenty-five years ago, BeerLeg, Dawkeye and myself let Onepotscreamer drive us along these very roads every day when we stayed in Collobrieres for a fortnight. What on earth were we thinking?

Here’s the bike I’ve rented for my time here in the South of France. It’s the bike rental shop’s standard model, ‘for man and lady’, as the man in the shop put it. It has the features of a typical upright, apart from the narrow handlebars that are in the mountain bike style. The basket is a nice extra, useful for shopping as you can see.

Here’s the bike I’ve rented for my time here in the South of France. It’s the bike rental shop’s standard model, ‘for man and lady’, as the man in the shop put it. It has the features of a typical upright, apart from the narrow handlebars that are in the mountain bike style. The basket is a nice extra, useful for shopping as you can see.

I am at present checking out the fleshpots of the French Riviera. It’s been alright so far.

I’m sorry about the recent lack of weather-related posts. It’s just that the weather has been pleasant for a fair while now and I can’t think of any aspect of it to complain about.

I’m sorry about the recent lack of weather-related posts. It’s just that the weather has been pleasant for a fair while now and I can’t think of any aspect of it to complain about.

The Bishop of Leicester will doubtless breathe a sigh of relief when he discovers that I have moved from being neutral about the design of the Richard III tomb (above) to now being a cautious supporter of the plan. It is claimed that the tomb will be strategically situated near a window, which will cause an impressive natural illumination in the deep incisions. It’s better than the design put forward by the Richard III Society, a design that looks like a Victorian-era pastiche of a Medieval tomb. That plan would certainly have been rejected by the Cathedrals Fabric Commission for England (CFCE) so Leicester Cathedral was right to say “thanks, but no thanks” to the Richard III Society:
It’s also a considerable improvement on the Cathedral’s original design (rightly rejected by the CFCE), which featured a garishly over-sized White Rose as a base:
I’ll support the present design as it’s an improvement on both of these, although I’d have preferred a simple and tasteful ledger stone, similar to the memorial stone that’s been in Leicester Cathedral since 1982:

The Bishop of Leicester will doubtless breathe a sigh of relief when he discovers that I have moved from being neutral about the design of the Richard III tomb (above) to now being a cautious supporter of the plan. It is claimed that the tomb will be strategically situated near a window, which will cause an impressive natural illumination in the deep incisions. It’s better than the design put forward by the Richard III Society, a design that looks like a Victorian-era pastiche of a Medieval tomb. That plan would certainly have been rejected by the Cathedrals Fabric Commission for England (CFCE) so Leicester Cathedral was right to say “thanks, but no thanks” to the Richard III Society:

It’s also a considerable improvement on the Cathedral’s original design (rightly rejected by the CFCE), which featured a garishly over-sized White Rose as a base:

I’ll support the present design as it’s an improvement on both of these, although I’d have preferred a simple and tasteful ledger stone, similar to the memorial stone that’s been in Leicester Cathedral since 1982:

'Beyond Stillness', the new Richard III sculpture (at Leicester Cathedral)

'Beyond Stillness', the new Richard III sculpture (at Leicester Cathedral)

Mark E. Smith sat on a wall…

Mark E. Smith sat on a wall

Mark E. Smith started The Fall

All the King’s horses

And all the King’s men

Have probably been members

I thought this entry, by one Mark McCarthy, was the best of the ‘rock and roll nursery rhymes’ that listeners were asked to contribute during Friday’s Radcliffe and Maconie on BBC 6Music.

Flight of the Stories - The Imperial War Museum’s new First World War galleries

As we discovered last Saturday, London’s Imperial War Museum is closed until July 19th for the construction of some new WWI galleries. This animation from Aardman has been made to publicise the re-opening.

We went down to London today. We looked at some ‘challenging’ architecture in Southwark, checked out the Soviet propaganda posters at the Tate Modern and met a delightful young American couple. A thoroughly pleasant day out.