Homebrew 10: Imperial Stout
This was made from a budget Harvest Stout kit, which I tweaked to bring the ABV up to 6.9%. I managed this by making a couple of litres less than it said on the tin and by adding a half kilo jar of malt extract from a health food shop as well as the prescribed kilo of sugar. Of the sugar, 60% was dark muscovado for extra flavour and I also added some Goldings hops. The result is a well-balanced stout which goes very well with the Stilton cheese that is always consumed over Christmas. 

Homebrew 10: Imperial Stout

This was made from a budget Harvest Stout kit, which I tweaked to bring the ABV up to 6.9%. I managed this by making a couple of litres less than it said on the tin and by adding a half kilo jar of malt extract from a health food shop as well as the prescribed kilo of sugar. Of the sugar, 60% was dark muscovado for extra flavour and I also added some Goldings hops. The result is a well-balanced stout which goes very well with the Stilton cheese that is always consumed over Christmas. 

Homebrew 2: Mystery Stout
I’ve called my second-ever homebrew beer “Mystery Stout” because its alcoholic strength is a mystery to me. If I’d followed the BruPack kit instructions to the letter, I should have ended up with a 4.5% to 5% ABV beer. However, I added a whole lot of muscovado sugar to both increase strength and add flavour. As I didn’t have a hydrometer at the time, I don’t know by how much (if at all) this has increased the strength. I have since purchased a hydrometer so I shouldn’t have this problem again.
As you can see, the beer was poured from a 275ml Dragon Stout bottle into a 2012 Leicester Beer Festival Mr Pickwick half pint glass. Unlike my first homebrew, it has a good head, no doubt because I added more sugar to each bottle for the secondary fermentation. It has a rich, coffee-ish taste, with some rum-like notes from the muscovado sugar. It’s not bad at all, to be honest. It’s definitely better than Guinness and Dragon Stout and I’d probably make it again.

Homebrew 2: Mystery Stout

I’ve called my second-ever homebrew beer “Mystery Stout” because its alcoholic strength is a mystery to me. If I’d followed the BruPack kit instructions to the letter, I should have ended up with a 4.5% to 5% ABV beer. However, I added a whole lot of muscovado sugar to both increase strength and add flavour. As I didn’t have a hydrometer at the time, I don’t know by how much (if at all) this has increased the strength. I have since purchased a hydrometer so I shouldn’t have this problem again.

As you can see, the beer was poured from a 275ml Dragon Stout bottle into a 2012 Leicester Beer Festival Mr Pickwick half pint glass. Unlike my first homebrew, it has a good head, no doubt because I added more sugar to each bottle for the secondary fermentation. It has a rich, coffee-ish taste, with some rum-like notes from the muscovado sugar. It’s not bad at all, to be honest. It’s definitely better than Guinness and Dragon Stout and I’d probably make it again.

I thought I’d make a start on my second batch of homebrew beer while I’m waiting for my first batch to be ready to drink. I followed the instructions to the letter with my first batch so I thought I’d make a few changes with my second lot. I’m using a BruPaks stout kit, which consists of a 1.5kg can of malt extract, some hop pellets and roasted grains in giant tea bags as well as some yeast, and I’ll be making it in my BruBox once again. According to the manufacturers, this should make a stout of 4.5% to 5% ABV. I reckon that if I add 500g of dark muscovado sugar, I could push the ABV up to about 8% and so turn this everyday stout into a mighty Imperial Stout. The muscovado sugar should also add some colour and flavour. 

To further help the increase in flavour that this stronger beer will need, I also added 10 Yogi Tea Choco Aztec Spice tea bags . The Yogi Choco box was covered with all sorts of New Age twaddle, but a close look at the ingredients showed that it contains cocoa shells, barley malt and a variety of spices, which should go well in a stout. Nothing can possibly go wrong with this.

I thought I’d make a start on my second batch of homebrew beer while I’m waiting for my first batch to be ready to drink. I followed the instructions to the letter with my first batch so I thought I’d make a few changes with my second lot. I’m using a BruPaks stout kit, which consists of a 1.5kg can of malt extract, some hop pellets and roasted grains in giant tea bags as well as some yeast, and I’ll be making it in my BruBox once again. According to the manufacturers, this should make a stout of 4.5% to 5% ABV. I reckon that if I add 500g of dark muscovado sugar, I could push the ABV up to about 8% and so turn this everyday stout into a mighty Imperial Stout. The muscovado sugar should also add some colour and flavour. To further help the increase in flavour that this stronger beer will need, I also added 10 Yogi Tea Choco Aztec Spice tea bags . The Yogi Choco box was covered with all sorts of New Age twaddle, but a close look at the ingredients showed that it contains cocoa shells, barley malt and a variety of spices, which should go well in a stout. Nothing can possibly go wrong with this.